Back In The Saddle Again

Monday, May 19, 2008

Well, the twins are born, Mrs. Smitty and I are managing well and I am finally able to get some sleep, as today is my first day back to work. Long legislative committee hearings on irrelevent topics are prime nap material.

This also means I'm back off the wagon and the beer reviews will pour. I got my hands on a case of this year's Sam Adams Long Shot winners...a weizenbock and a grape pale ale. Reviews this Friday, as usual.

Bob, great post last Friday that Sopor and Infamous Roger turned into a keg sanitization discussion, which was actually totally awesome because now that our basement remodeling project is almost done, I'm taking the plunge to stop filling 50 thankless fucking bottles of beer every time I brew and will be filling 1 single keg instead. Jesus why did it take this long to fianlly get fed-up with bottling beer???

Cheers!

8 comments:

Bob "Chief Beer Advocate" 2:45 PM  

Good the hear you are back and great to hear the family is doing well.

Do you have your trim done yet in the basement? I may be able to lend a hand with that at some point.

Sopor 3:51 PM  

Woohoo! Go Kegs!

I won't go back to bottling... EVER.

B Mac 3:52 PM  

Welcome back to the blogroll.

Dumb question from a brewing novice; does kegging the beer limit what you can do with it? For example, with beers that require bottle-conditioning, can you simply "keg-condition" them? It seems like the chemistry/biology would work the same, but what do I know?

B Mac 3:59 PM  

A fitting tribute to your return...


http://www.spike.com/episode/27412/st/2981818

steves 7:00 PM  

Jesus why did it take this long to fianlly get fed-up with bottling beer???

Low IQ? C'mon that was too easy to pass up.

Smitty 9:11 PM  

can you simply "keg-condition" them

Quite simply, yes.

the infamous roger 12:03 AM  

Back to work. Oh well, sounds like everything is covered on the homefront.

Bottling definitely was the worst part of brewing for me.

If you keg condition for carbonation, be sure to seal the lids with a blast of CO2 from a tank.

IMO, CO2 is CO2. Your homebrew is going to have a lot of yeast left in solution even after extended cold conditioning. You can force carbonate and still have a "living" beer that will age in bottles or kegs.

George 1:16 PM  

Good luck back at work. Time to get drinking!

Post a Comment

Followers

Potential Drunks

Search This Blog

  © Blogger template On The Road by Ourblogtemplates.com 2009

Back to TOP